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How to Keep Kids Happy During Your House Move

Ready to make your house move an adventure for the whole family? Moving can be a bit chaotic, but it doesn't have to be overwhelming for your kids.  With a few simple strategies, you can turn the process into a fun (or at least bearable!) experience.  


Let's look at some ways to keep your kids engaged, manage their emotions, and help them embrace the excitement of a new home.




The Power of Positive Framing


It's all about perspective! How you frame the move to your kids has a massive impact on their attitude. Here's how to shift their mindset from upheaval to adventure:


  • The "Explorers" Narrative: Instead of focusing on leaving the old behind, emphasise the excitement of exploring a new place. Talk about discovering secret playgrounds, trying awesome local cafes, and making new friends who haven't heard all their old jokes yet!

  • Kid Power: Kids thrive on feeling important. Turn them into "Super Moving Helpers" with age-appropriate jobs. Toddlers can "sort" toys into boxes (even if you tidy it up later). Older kids can help research their new neighbourhood's coolest features or pack their own belongings.

  • Choice Matters: Even in a situation they didn't choose, give them control where possible. Let them pick their moving day outfit, which stuffed animal rides in the front seat, or the first meal they want in the new house. These small choices reduce feelings of powerlessness.

Extra Insights:


  • Hype It Up: Get excited about the new house yourself! Your enthusiasm is contagious. Share fun facts about the new area or show photos of the coolest room online.

  • Visualise the Future: Look up pictures of nearby parks, libraries, or swimming pools. Talk about all the fun adventures that await in these new spaces.

  • Age Matters: Be realistic about what each age group can handle. Toddlers live in the moment, so focus on immediate fun. Teens might need more time to process the bigger emotions of the move.

Handling the Emotional Side of Moving


Even with the most positive framing, it's normal for kids to experience a rollercoaster of emotions during a move. Here's how to provide the support they need:


  • Validate, Don't Dismiss: Acknowledge their sadness, anger, or worry without minimising their feelings. Phrases like, "It's okay to miss your old room," or "I know it feels scary to start a new school," show you understand, even if you also focus on the positives.

  • Talk It Out: Create a safe space for them to express their feelings. Ask open-ended questions like, "What are you most excited about? What worries you a little?" Active listening helps them feel heard.

  • Saying Goodbye: Closure is important. Help them plan a special goodbye to their old home, friends, and favourite places. This could be a farewell party, creating a memory book of photos, or a "goodbye walk" around their old neighbourhood.

  • Comfort Zone: Pack their most cherished items – favourite stuffed animals, familiar blankets, bedtime books – so they have a sense of continuity in the new environment. A little bit of home goes a long way in those first uncertain days.

  • When Extra Help is Needed: Most kids adjust with time and support. However, if your child's distress seems excessive or prolonged, don't hesitate to seek additional help. A school counsellor or a therapist specialising in childhood transitions can provide extra tools to navigate the move.

Remember: Patience is key.  Even the most excited kids may have moments of feeling overwhelmed or homesick.  Your ongoing reassurance and understanding will make all the difference.


Age-Specific Activities


Keeping kids occupied helps the move go smoother for everyone!  Here are ideas tailored to different age groups:


Toddlers & Young Kids

  • The "Treasure Hunt" Packing Game: Hide small toys, treats, or stickers in boxes while packing. It turns a tedious task into a fun discovery game!

  • Box Fort Fun: Before recycling those empty boxes, let them build magical castles, cosy hideouts, or rocket ships for some imaginative play.

  • Familiar Faces: Schedule video calls with grandparents, cousins, or friends who live far away to bridge the distance and keep those connections strong.

School-Age Kids

  • Neighborhood Explorers: Get them hyped for the new area! Research parks, cool shops, or kid-friendly events near your new home and create a "must-do" bucket list.

  • Room Design Dreams: Let them express their style! Browse room décor ideas together online, create a Pinterest board, or let them sketch out their dream space.

  • The "Goodbye Party" Plan: Help them organise a farewell gathering with their old friends. A fun memory makes the transition a bit easier.

Teens

  • New Space, New Style: Give them a budget and let them brainstorm how to personalise their new room. Fresh paint, cool posters, or unique lighting creates ownership and excitement.

  • Maintaining Connections: Help them find social media groups, clubs, or sports teams related to their interests in the new area. Virtual connections can ease the transition.

  • Tech Time: Moving is stressful for everyone. Offering a bit more screen time for relaxation and de-stressing is sometimes the best strategy for keeping the peace.

The Moving Day Toolkit

Moving day can feel like a whirlwind. Here's how to create pockets of calm for your kids amidst the chaos:

  • The Busy Bag: This is your secret weapon! Pre-pack a special bag or backpack with age-appropriate activities: new colouring books, simple travel games, small toys, and their favourite snacks. This keeps them occupied when everything else is in boxes.

  • Comfort Corner: Designate a space in your new home as their "decompression zone". Set it up with comfy blankets, pillows, favourite books, or stuffed animals. When they need a break from the unpacking frenzy, they have a safe haven to retreat to.

  • Celebrate the Wins: Even if it feels far from perfect, mark the milestone of the first night in your new home. Order takeout, have a mini ice cream party, or put on a favourite movie. Turning it into a small celebration shifts the focus to the positive.

Important Tip:  If possible, enlist the help of a grandparent, trusted babysitter, or friend to take the kids out for a few hours on moving day. A park outing or a trip to the movies gives the movers space to work and allows the kids to decompress away from the moving chaos.

Making Moves Smooth for Families: Denix Moving

Moving with kids can feel overwhelming, but it doesn't have to be. House removal experts who understand the unique challenges of families can make a world of difference. Denix Moving goes the extra mile to ensure a smooth transition for everyone:

  • Friendly Faces: Our experienced team knows how to interact with children in a positive way. A simple smile, asking about a favourite toy, or offering a high-five can ease anxieties and make kids feel acknowledged during the moving process.

  • Special Delivery: Denix movers understand the importance of creating a sense of comfort and familiarity in the new space. If you have a "Kid's First Night Box" or a beloved toy, we can prioritise placing it in the child's new room, creating a happy surprise and a welcoming atmosphere.

  • Understanding & Patience: Denix Moving understands that families have unique needs. Letting us know you're moving with children allows us to tailor our approach, prioritising a calm and efficient moving day that minimises disruption for everyone involved.

Extra Tip:  Point out familiar items as the Denix movers unload them.  Phrases like "Look! Here comes your favourite chair!" reinforces a sense of continuity for your kids and creates excitement about setting up their new room.

Denix Moving: Your Partner in a Smooth Family Move

With Denix Moving's experience and family-friendly approach, your move can be the start of an exciting new chapter, not a stressful experience for your children. 

Contact Denix Moving today for a free quote or book online immediately and see how we can make your family's move as smooth and seamless as possible.


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